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Gardens in the summer, war zones in the winter

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MARKET:Cliff and Arlene Kindy of Joyfield Farm stand behind their booth Wednesday at the North Manchester Farmers’ Market.
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BOOTHS:On Wednesday in the parking lot of Riverbridge Electric, the North Manchester Farmers’ Market featured two booths placed side-by-side.The one on the right belonged to Brittany Denney of Denney Farm, and on the left was Cliff and Arlene Kindy of Joyfield Farm.
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ZUCCHINIS: Zucchinis from Denney Farm were for sale Wednesday at the North Manchester Farmers’ Market.

by Rob Burgess - rburgess@wabashplaindealer.com

On Wednesday in the parking lot of Riverbridge Electric, the North Manchester Farmers’ Market featured two booths placed side-by-side.

The one on the right belonged to Brittany Denney of Denney Farm, and on the left was Cliff and Arlene Kindy of Joyfield Farm.

The Kindys have been growing and selling produce at their farm about 5 miles from here for around 35 years.

Cliff said they usually attend the Saturday farmers’ market, and that this was their first appearance on a Wednesday this year.

“Now we finally have enough produce it makes it worthwhile to come Wednesday,” he said.

Cliff said this is the only farmers’ market they sell to. In addition, they also sell to 3 Rivers Natural Grocery Food Co-op & Deli in Fort Wayne. He said the excess precipitation which has plagued many local farmers hasn’t hurt their yields.

“For us it’s been a good year,” he said.

Arlene said that despite a slow start, their lettuce crops were thriving.

“It likes wet,” she said, of the lettuce.

Cliff said the lettuce usually prefers cooler weather, but was still doing well regardless. He said later in the season they plan to sell cabbages, onions, potatoes, sweet potatoes, winter squashes, cantaloupes, mush melons, watermelons, zucchinis, leeks and garlic.

“It’s coming this week, maybe,” he said, of the garlic.

Cliff said they will continue to sell produce through the end of October when the market closes.

So, what do they do they do in the winter?

“Rest,” said Cliff.

Arlene further defined the term.

“We do disaster work,” she said.

Cliff said Arlene volunteered three months last year in North Carolina, and he was down there for two months.

Cliff said he used to do a lot of work with Christian Peacemaker Teams in the war zones of the world including Iraq, Gaza and Columbia.

“So, it was a change,” he said. “At the end of the summer we’re ready for a break. And Gaza and Iraq and wherever were breaks. And then, after a few months of that, we need a break from that. So, the garden is a break.

“It’s like you’re always on vacation,” he said.